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Effects of whey protein supplementation on adiposity, body weight and glycemic parameters: A synthesis of evidence

Published:September 27, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2022.09.014
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      Highlights

      • Protein consumption has been shown to attenuate muscle loss.
      • Whey protein may optimize body fat loss during calorie restriction or in ad libitum intake.
      • Whey protein is considered important factors during the weight loss process, improving satiety.
      • Whey protein improves the insulin resistance.

      Abstract

      Aims

      The aim of this review was to analyze the evidence of whey protein supplementation on body weight, fat mass, lean mass and glycemic parameters in subjects with overweight or T2DM undergoing calorie restriction or with ad libitum intake. Data synthesis: Overweight and obesity are considered risk factors for the development of chronic noncommunicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. Caloric restriction, used as a strategy for reducing weight and fat mass, may promote the improvement of glycemic parameters, but simultaneously decrease muscle mass. The maintenance of muscle mass during weight loss is necessary in view of its implication in preventing chronic diseases, improving functional capacity and quality of life. The effects of increased protein consumption on attenuating muscle loss and reducing body fat during caloric restriction or ad libitum intake in overweight individuals are discussed. In short-term, some studies have demonstrated positive effects of whey protein supplementation on improving satiety and postprandial glycemic control, although it is still unclear whether long-term whey protein can positively affect glycemic parameters.

      Conclusions

      Despite whey protein is considered a protein with a high nutritional quality, its effects in the treatment of overweight, obese individuals and type 2 diabetes mellitus submitted to calorie restriction or ad libitum intake are still inconclusive.

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