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Association between migraine or severe headache and hypertension among US adults: a cross-sectional study

  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Jing ZHANG
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    M.A.O. Yukang
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China

    Department of Cardiology, The Affiliated Suzhou Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou Municipal Hospital, Gusu School, Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, 215000, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Yansong LI
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Geriatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
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  • Kun ZHAO
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
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  • Qiyang XIE
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
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  • Kai WANG
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +86 2568305071,
    Affiliations
    Department of Geriatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
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  • Jing SHI
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel./fax: +86 25-68303131,
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work.
Published:November 17, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2022.11.014
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      Highlights

      • The cross-sectional data of 5716 subjects was obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2004. 5716 subjects were enrolled in the present study, of whom 1134 (19.8%) had migraine or severe headaches.
      • Participants with migraine were mostly younger females and had a higher body mass index (BMI), a lower educational level, lower dietary intake of potassium and calcium, lower serum level of total cholesterol, creatinine, and hemoglobin, as well as higher eGFR level.
      • This study showed a positive correlation between migraine and hypertension. Our findings highlighted the significance of managing migraine in preventing hypertension.

      Abstract

      Background and aims

      Epidemiological evidence of the association between migraines, severe headaches, and hypertension is contradictory. Hypertension is a critical risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Migraine is a common neurological disease and a major cause of disability worldwide. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between migraine, severe headaches, and hypertension among US adults.

      Methods and results

      Cross-sectional data from 5716 subjects were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2004. Weighted logistic regression models investigated the association between migraines, severe headaches, and hypertension. In total, 5716 subjects were enrolled in the present study, of whom 1134 (19.8%) had migraine or severe headaches. Participants with migraine were predominantly younger females and had a higher body mass index (BMI), lower educational level, lower dietary intake of potassium and calcium, lower serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), creatinine, and hemoglobin, as well as a higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (all P < 0.05). After fully adjusting for potential confounders, migraine or severe headaches were positively associated with hypertension (OR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.03–1.53).

      Conclusion

      Our study found a positive association between migraine, severe headaches, and hypertension. Further studies are needed to verify the causality of this association and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

      Keywords

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